Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/10630
Authors: Dutta Gupta, Tanay* 
Riguzzi, Federica* 
Dasgupta, Sujit* 
Mukhopadhyay, Basab* 
Roy, Sujit* 
Sharma, Somnath* 
Title: Kinematics and strain rates of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis from new GPS campaigns in Northeast India
Issue Date: 2015
Series/Report no.: /655(2015)
DOI: 10.1016/j.tecto.2015.04.017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/10630
Keywords: GPS data
Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (EHS)
India plate
Block modeling
strain rate
locked fault
Subject ClassificationCrustal deformation
Abstract: Newly acquired GPS data along transects across Himalaya in Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (EHS) reveal a clockwise rotation of rigid micro-plate comprising part of Brahmaputra valley, NE Himalaya and Northern Myanmar that rotates about a pole located at 14.5°N, 100.8°E at an angular rate of 1.75 ± 0.12°/Myr. The EHS is being torn-off from the main Indian Plate as a rigid block around which the kinematic clockwise rotation of Tibetan GPS sites toward the Sichuan-Yunnan region occurs in the Eurasia fixed frame. The residual velocity field of the newly acquired data estimated after removing the rotation that minimizes the GPS rates around EHS show a clear NE motion of the EHS sites, indentation of the rigid Indian plate into a less rigid area of the Eurasian plate. Themost extensive EHS zones of compression and shortening are in the direction of indenter convergence, with average values ranging between ~50–100 nanostrain/year. Along the frontal segment of EHS, from NWto SE, the shortening rate is reduced from the local maximum value of 160 to ~80 nanostrain/year, thus indicating a possibly locked fault patch of Mishmi or Lohit thrusts, the southernmost part of segment activated during the large 1950 Assam earthquake, Mw 8.6. An elastic block-model was invoked to infer the average slip rates of sections around EHS and to estimate an average locking depth of ~15 km. The slip rate perpendicular to the locked sector of EHS reaches 32.4mm/year and permits to roughly infer a recurrence time of ~200 year for an earthquake as energetic as the 1950 Assam event.
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