Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/7480
Authors: Favalli, M.* 
Fornaciai, A.* 
Isola, I.* 
Tarquini, S.* 
Nannipieri, L.* 
Title: Multiview 3D reconstruction in geosciences
Journal: Computers & geosciences 
Series/Report no.: /44(2012)
Publisher: Elsevier Science Limited
Issue Date: 2012
DOI: 10.1016/j.cageo.2011.09.012
URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098300411003128
Keywords: Multiview
3D reconstruction
Laser scanner
Outcrop
Subject Classification05. General::05.04. Instrumentation and techniques of general interest::05.04.99. General or miscellaneous 
Abstract: Multiview three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction is a technology that allows the creation of 3D models of a given scenario from a series of overlapping pictures taken using consumer-grade digital cameras. This type of 3D reconstruction is facilitated by freely available software, which does not require expert-level skills. This technology provides a 3D working environment, which integrates sample/field data visualization and measurement tools. In this study, we test the potential of this method for 3D reconstruction of decimeter-scale objects of geological interest. We generated 3D models of three different outcrops exposed in a marble quarry and two solids: a volcanic bomb and a stalagmite. Comparison of the models obtained in this study using the presented method with those obtained using a precise laser scanner shows that multiview 3D reconstruction yields models that present a root mean square error/average linear dimensions between 0.11 and 0.68%. Thus this technology turns out to be an extremely promising tool, which can be fruitfully applied in geosciences.
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