Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/11698
Authors: Tarquini, Simone 
Title: A review of mass and energy flow through a lava flow system: Insights provided from a non-equilibrium perspective
Issue Date: Aug-2017
Series/Report no.: /79 (2017)
DOI: 10.1007/s00445-017-1145-5
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/11698
Keywords: lava flows
thermal proxy
heat balance
lava flow morphology
lava flow emplacement
Abstract: A simple formula relates lava discharge rate to the heat radiated per unit time from the surface of active lava flows (the “thermal proxy”). Although widely used, the physical basis of this proxy is still debated. In the present contribution, lava flows are approached as open, dissipative systems that, under favorable conditions, can attain a non-equilibrium stationary state. In this systems framework, the onset, growth and demise of lava flow units can be explained as a self-organization phenomenon characterized by a given temporal frequency defined by the average life span of active lava flow units. Here, I review empirical, physical, and experimental models designed to understand and link the flow of mass and energy through a lava flow system, as well as measurements and observations that support a “real world” view. I set up two systems: active lava flow system (or ALFS) for flowing, fluid lava and a lava deposit system for solidified, cooling lava. The review highlights surprising similarities between lava flows and electric currents, which typically work under stationary conditions. An electric current propagates almost instantaneously through an existing circuit, following the Kirchhoff law (a least dissipation principle). Flowing lavas, in contrast, build up a slow-motion “lava-circuit” over days, weeks or months by following a gravity-driven path down the steepest slopes. Attainment of a steady-state condition is hampered (and the classic thermal proxy does not hold) if the supply stops before completion of the “lava-circuit”. Although gravity determines initial flow path and extension, the least dissipation principle means that subsequent evolution of mature portions of the active lava flow system is controlled by increasingly insulated conditions.
Appears in Collections:Papers Published / Papers in press

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Tarquini_BV_2017_review.pdf2.56 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

Page view(s)

12
Last Week
0
Last month
3
checked on Jul 21, 2018

Download(s)

9
checked on Jul 21, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric