Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/11308
Authors: Merucci, Luca* 
Zakšek, Klemen* 
Carboni, Elisa* 
Corradini, Stefano* 
Title: Stereoscopic Estimation of Volcanic Ash Cloud-Top Height from Two Geostationary Satellites
Issue Date: 2016
Series/Report no.: /8 (2016)
DOI: 10.3390/rs8030206
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/11308
Abstract: The characterization of volcanic ash clouds released into the atmosphere during explosive eruptions includes cloud height as a fundamental physical parameter. A novel application is proposed of a method based on parallax data acquired from two geostationary instruments for estimating ash cloud-top height (ACTH). An improved version of the method with a detailed discussion of height retrieval accuracy was applied to estimate ACTH from two datasets acquired by two satellites in favorable positions to fully exploit the parallax effect. A combination of MSG SEVIRI (HRV band; 1000 m nadir spatial resolution, 5 min temporal resolution) and Meteosat-7 MVIRI (VIS band, 2500 m nadir spatial resolution, 30 min temporal resolution) was implemented. Since MVIRI does not acquire data at exactly the same time as SEVIRI, a correction procedure enables compensation for wind advection in the atmosphere. The method was applied to the Mt. Etna, Sicily, Italy, eruption of 23 November 2013. The height of the volcanic cloud was tracked with a top height of ~8.5 km. The ash cloud estimate was applied to the visible channels to show the potential accuracy that will soon be achievable also in the infrared range using the next generation of multispectral imagers. The new constellation of geostationary meteorological satellites will enable full exploitation of this technique for continuous global ACTH monitoring.
Appears in Collections:Papers Published / Papers in press

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
2016_Merucci_remotesensing_Stereo.pdf4.51 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

Page view(s)

10
Last Week
0
Last month
1
checked on Jul 20, 2018

Download(s)

1
checked on Jul 20, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric