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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/931

Authors: Baker, D. R.*
Freda, C.*
Brooker, R. A.*
Scarlato, P.*
Title: Volatile diffusion in silicate melts and its effects on melt inclusions
Issue Date: 2005
Series/Report no.: 48 (4-5)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/931
Keywords: diffusion
silicate melts
volatiles
water
carbon dioxide
sulfur
fluorine
igneous processes
chlorine
melt inclusion
Abstract: A compendium of diffusion measurements and their Arrhenius equations for water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, fluorine, and chlorine in silicate melts similar in composition to natural igneous rocks is presented. Water diffusion in silicic melts is well studied and understood, however little data exists for melts of intermediate to basic compositions. The data demonstrate that both the water concentration and the anhydrous melt composition affect the diffusion coefficient of water. Carbon dioxide diffusion appears only weakly dependent, at most, on the volatilefree melt composition and no effect of carbon dioxide concentration has been observed, although few experiments have been performed. Based upon one study, the addition of water to rhyolitic melts increases carbon dioxide diffusion by orders of magnitude to values similar to that of 6 wt% water. Sulfur diffusion in intermediate to silicic melts depends upon the anhydrous melt composition and the water concentration. In water-bearing silicic melts sulfur diffuses 2 to 3 orders of magnitude slower than water. Chlorine diffusion is affected by both water concentration and anhydrous melt composition; its values are typically between those of water and sulfur. Information on fluorine diffusion is rare, but the volatile-free melt composition exerts a strong control on its diffusion. At the present time the diffusion of water, carbon dioxide, sulfur and chlorine can be estimated in silicic melts at magmatic temperatures. The diffusion of water and carbon dioxide in basic to intermediate melts is only known at a limited set of temperatures and compositions. The diffusion data for rhyolitic melts at 800°C together with a standard model for the enrichment of incompatible elements in front of growing crystals demonstrate that rapid crystal growth, greater than 10-10 ms-1, can significantly increase the volatile concentrations at the crystal-melt interface and that any of that melt trapped by the formation of melt inclusions may not be representative of the bulk melt. However, basaltic melt inclusions trapped at 1300°C are more likely to contain bulk melt concentrations of water and carbon dioxide.
Appears in Collections:Manuscripts
04.08.01. Gases
04.08.03. Magmas
Annals of Geophysics
Papers Published / Papers in press

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