Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/8473
AuthorsDe Santis, A.* 
Qamili, E.* 
Spada, G.* 
Gasperini, P.* 
TitleGeomagnetic South Atlantic Anomaly and global sea level rise: A direct Connection?
Issue Date2012
Series/Report no./74 (2012)
DOI10.1016/j.jastp.2011.10.015
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/2122/8473
KeywordsEarth magnetic field
South Atlantic Anomaly
Global Sea Level
Subject Classification04. Solid Earth::04.05. Geomagnetism::04.05.05. Main geomagnetic field 
AbstractWe highlight the existence of an intriguing and to date unreported relationship between the surface area of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) of the geomagnetic field and the current trend in global sea level rise. These two geophysical variables have been growing coherently during the last three centuries, thus strongly suggesting a causal relationship supported by some statistical tests. The monotonic increase of the SAA surface area since 1600 may have been associated with an increased inflow of radiation energy through the inner Van Allen belt with a consequent warming of the Earth’s atmosphere and finally global sea level rise. An alternative suggestive and original explanation is also offered, in which pressure changes at the core–mantle boundary cause surface deformations and relative sea level variations. Although we cannot establish a clear connection between SAA dynamics and global warming, the strong correlation between the former and global sea level supports the idea that global warming may be at least partly controlled by deep Earth processes triggering geomagnetic phenomena, such as the South Atlantic Anomaly, on a century time scale.
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