Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/8197
AuthorsBonforte, A.* 
Federico, C.* 
Giammanco, S.* 
Guglielmino, F.* 
Liuzzo, M.* 
Neri, M.* 
TitleSoil gases and SAR measurements reveal hidden faults on the sliding flank of Mt. Etna (Italy)
Issue Date2013
Series/Report no./251(2013)
DOI10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2012.08.010
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/2122/8197
KeywordsCO2
Radon
InSAR
Faults
Etna
Volcano-tectonics
Subject Classification04. Solid Earth::04.03. Geodesy::04.03.01. Crustal deformations 
04. Solid Earth::04.03. Geodesy::04.03.07. Satellite geodesy 
04. Solid Earth::04.04. Geology::04.04.12. Fluid Geochemistry 
04. Solid Earth::04.07. Tectonophysics::04.07.07. Tectonics 
04. Solid Earth::04.08. Volcanology::04.08.01. Gases 
04. Solid Earth::04.08. Volcanology::04.08.07. Instruments and techniques 
AbstractFrom October 2008 to November 2009, soil CO2, radon and structural field surveys were performed on Mt. Etna, in order to acquire insights into active tectonic structures in a densely populated sector of the south-eastern flank of the volcano, which is involved in the flank dynamics, as highlighted by satellite data (InSAR). The studied area extends about 150 km2, in a sector of the volcano where InSAR results detected several lineaments that were not well-defined from previous geological surveys. In order to validate and better constrain these features with ground data evidences, soil CO2 and soil radon measurements were performed along transects roughly orthogonal to the newly detected faults, with measurement points spaced about 100 m. In each transect, the highest CO2 values were found very close to the lineaments evidenced by InSAR observations. Anomalous soil CO2 and radon values were also measured at old eruptive fractures. In some portions of the investigated area soil gas anomalies were rather broad over transects, probably suggesting a complex structural framework consisting of several parallel volcano-tectonic structures, instead of a single one. Soil gas measurements proved particularly useful in areas at higher altitude on Mt. Etna (i.e. above 900 m asl), where InSAR results are not very informative/ are fairly limited, and allowed recognizing the prolongation of some tectonic lineaments towards the summit of the volcano. At a lower altitude on the volcanic edifice, soil gas anomalies define the active structures indicated by InSAR results prominently, down to almost the coastline and through the northern periphery of the city of Catania. Coupling InSARwith soil gas prospectingmethods has thus proved to be a powerful tool in detecting hidden active structures that do not show significant field evidences.
Appears in Collections:Papers Published / Papers in press

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Bonforte_et_al_JVGR_2013_Soilgas.pdf2.67 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

Page view(s)

135
Last Week
0
Last month
2
checked on Aug 17, 2017

Download(s)

38
checked on Aug 17, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric