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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/7621

Authors: Sbarra, P.*
De Rubeis, V.*
Di Luzio, E.*
Mancini, M.*
Moscatelli, M.*
Stigliano, F.*
Tosi, P.*
Vallone, R*
Title: Macroseismic effects highlight site response in Rome and its geological signature
Title of journal: Natural Hazards
Series/Report no.: 2/62 (2012)
Publisher: Springer
Issue Date: 2012
DOI: 10.1007/s11069-012-0085-9
URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/k42426n3h28t0238/
Keywords: Earthquakes
Intensity residuals
Urban geosciences
Macroseismic effects
Amplification areas
Abstract: A detailed analysis of the earthquake effects on the urban area of Rome has been conducted for the L’Aquila sequence, which occurred in April 2009, by using an on-line macroseismic questionnaire. Intensity residuals calculated using the mainshock and four aftershocks are analyzed in the light of a very accurate and original geological reconstruction of the subsoil of Rome based on a large amount of wells. The aim of this work is to highlight ground motion amplification areas and to find a correlation with the geological settings at a sub-regional scale, putting in evidence the extreme complexity of the phenomenon and the difficulty of making a simplified model. Correlations between amplification areas and both near-surface and deep geology were found. Moreover, the detailed scale of investigation has permitted us to find a correlation between seismic amplification in recent alluvial settings and subsiding zones, and between heard seismic sound and Tiber alluvial sediments.
Appears in Collections:04.04.09. Structural geology
04.06.11. Seismic risk
04.06.04. Ground motion
Papers Published / Papers in press

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