Earth-prints repository, logo   DSpace

About DSpace Software
|earth-prints home page | roma library | bologna library | catania library | milano library | napoli library | palermo library
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/5301

Authors: Cara, F.*
Title: On the stability and reproducibility of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios on ambient noise: the case study of Cavola, northern Italy
Issue Date: 2009
Keywords: microtremors
Abstract: Horizontal-to vertical-spectral ratios using ambient noise (HVNSR) are commonly used in site effects studies. In the practice, many operators assume stability over time of HVNSR and base their analyses on few very short time windows. The availability of a long period of continuous microtremor recording, allowed us to analyze three months of data coming from a dense array experiment performed at Cavola, a village in northern Apennines. This condition offers a good opportunity to check the validity of the stability assumption and to investigate variations of the local ambient noise wave-field composition. The Cavola site is characterised by landslide sediments over stiffer materials with a moderate impedance contrast, and by a complex morphology. An intense industrial activity in the village contributes to the generation of seismic noise. After identifying this noise source in the time series, we evaluate its effects on HVNSR. The results indicate that the spectral peak of HVNSR varies in amplitude and frequency, posing a warning about stability in time. Analyzing the spectra we identify the anthropic activity as responsible for changes in the composition of the noise wave-field. These variations affect HVNSR, including peak frequency, and also ground motion polarization.
Appears in Collections:04.06.09. Waves and wave analysis
Manuscripts
04.06.06. Surveys, measurements, and monitoring

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormatVisibility
Cara et al 2009-08-06rev.pdfMain article without figures106.92 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.


Share this record
Del.icio.us

Citeulike

Connotea

Facebook

Stumble it!

reddit


 

Valid XHTML 1.0! ICT Support, development & maintenance are provided by CINECA. Powered on DSpace Software. CINECA