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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/461

Authors: Tanner, L. H.*
Calvari, S.*
Title: Unusual sedimentary deposits on the SE side of Stromboli volcano, Italy: products of a tsunami caused by the ca. 5000 years BP Sciara del Fuoco collapse?
Title of journal: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
Series/Report no.: 4/137(2004)
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 15-Oct-2004
DOI: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2004.07.003
Keywords: tsunami
flank collapse
landslide
run-up
return flow
debris flow
Abstract: The role of sector collapse in the generation of catastrophic volcanigenic tsunami has become well understood only recently, in part because of the problems in the preservation and recognition of tsunami deposits. Tinti et al. [Tinti, S., Bortolucci, E., Romagnoli, C., 2000. Computer simulations of tsunamis due to sector collapse at Stromboli, Italy. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 96, 103–128] modeled a tsunami produced by the c. 5,000 years BP collapse of the Sciara del Fuoco on the island volcano Stromboli. Although deposits associated with this event are generally lacking on the island, volcaniclastic breccias on the SE side of the island extending to an elevation above 120 m a.s.l. may have been generated by this tsunami. Deposits above 100 m are dominated by coarse breccias comprising disorganized, poorly sorted, nonbedded, angular to subangular lava blocks in a matrix of finer pyroclastic debris. These breccias are interpreted as a water-induced mass flow, possibly a noncohesive debris flow, generated as colluvial material on steep slopes was remobilized by the return flow of the tsunami wave, the run-up of which reached an elevation exceeding 120 m a.s.l. Finer breccias of subrounded to rounded lava blocks cropping out at 15 m a.s.l. are similar to modern high-energy beach deposits and are interpreted as beach material redeposited by the advancing tsunami wave. The location of these deposits matches the predicted location of the maximum tsunami wave amplitude as calculated by modeling studies of Tinti et al. [Tinti, S., Bortolucci, E., Romagnoli, C., 2000. Computer simulations of tsunamis due to sector collapse at Stromboli, Italy. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 96, 103–128]. Whereas the identification and modeling of paleo-tsunami events is typically based on the observation of the sedimentary deposits of the tsunami run-up, return flow may be equally or more important in controlling patterns of sedimentation.
Appears in Collections:04.08.08. Volcanic risk
04.08.06. Volcano monitoring
Papers Published / Papers in press

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