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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/4270

Authors: Cianetti, S.*
Tinti, E.*
Giunchi, C.*
Cocco, M.*
Title: Modeling deformation rates in the Western Gulf of Corinth: rheological constraints
Title of journal: Geophysical Journal International
Series/Report no.: 2/174 (2008)
Publisher: Blackwell
Issue Date: Aug-2008
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2008.03845.x
URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120123656/abstract
Keywords: Numerical solutions
Plasticity, diffusion, and creep
Rheology and friction of fault zones
Continental tectonics: extensional
Dynamics and mechanics of faulting
Rheology: crust and lithosphere
Abstract: The Gulf of Corinth is one of the most active extensional regions in the Mediterranean area characterized by a high rate of seismicity. However, there are still open questions concerning the role and the geometry of the numerous active faults bordering the basin, as well as the mechanisms governing the seismicity. In this paper, we use a 2-D plane strain finite element analysis to constrain the upper crust rheology by modelling the available deformation data (GPS and geomorphology). We consider a SSW–NNE cross-section of the rift cutting the main active normal faults (Aigion, West Eliki and Off-Shore faults). The models run for 650 Kyr assuming an elasto-viscoplastic rheology and 1.3 cm yr−1 horizontal extension as boundary condition (resulting from GPS data). We model the horizontal and vertical deformation rates and the accumulation of plastic strain at depth, and we compare them with GPS data, with long term uplift rates inferred from geomorphology and with the distribution of seismicity, respectively. Our modelling results demonstrate that dislocation on high-angle normal faults in a plastic crustal layer plays a key role in explaining the extremely localized strain within the Gulf of Corinth. Conversely, the contribution of structures such as the antithetic Trizonia fault or the buried hypothetical subhorizontal discontinuity are not necessary to model observed data.
Appears in Collections:04.03.08. Theory and Models
Papers Published / Papers in press

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