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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/3081

Authors: Mazzarini, F.*
Pareschi, M. T.*
Favalli, M.*
Isola, I.*
Tarquini, S.*
Boschi, E.*
Title: Lava flow identification and aging by means of lidar intensity: Mount Etna case
Title of journal: Journal of Geophysical Research
Series/Report no.: /112 (2007)
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
Issue Date: 13-Feb-2007
DOI: 10.1029/2005JB004166
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/2364
Keywords: lava flows
mapping
lidar
Abstract: An application of light detection and ranging (lidar) intensity for the identification and mapping of different lava flows from the Mount Etna (Italy) active volcano is described. In September 2004 an airborne lidar survey was flown over summit sectors of Mount Etna. The information derived from lidar intensity values was used to compare the lava flows with respect to their age of emplacement. Analyzed lava flows vary in age between those dating prior to A.D. 1610 and those active during the survey (2004–2005 eruptions). The target-emitter distance, as well as surface roughness and texture at the lidar footprint scale, is the main parameter controlling the intensity response of lava flows. Variations in the roughness and texture of surfaces at a meter scale result from two main processes, initial lava cooling and subsequent surface weathering; both lead to variations in the original surface roughness of the flow. In summary: (1) initially, from the time of emplacement, the lidar intensity of lava flow surfaces decreases and (2) about 6 years after emplacement the lidar intensity of lava surfaces starts to increase with the age of flows. Lidar capability in terms of geometric (accuracy of ∼1 m in plan position and less than 1 m in elevation) and spectral (lidar intensity depends on surface reflection at λ = 1.064 μm) information can thus be effectively used to map lava flows and to define a relative chronology of lava emplacement.
Appears in Collections:04.08.07. Instruments and techniques
Papers Published / Papers in press

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