Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2122/10190
AuthorsPezzopane, M.* 
Pignalberi, A.* 
Pietrella, M.* 
TitleOn the solar cycle dependence of the amplitude modulation characterizing the mid-latitude sporadic E layer diurnal periodicity
Issue DateJan-2016
Series/Report no./137(2016)
DOI10.1016/j.jastp.2015.11.010
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/2122/10190
KeywordsSporadic E layer
Mid-latitude ionosphere
Tidal and Planetary wave
Nonlinear interaction
Subject Classification01. Atmosphere::01.02. Ionosphere::01.02.99. General or miscellaneous 
01. Atmosphere::01.02. Ionosphere::01.02.02. Dynamics 
01. Atmosphere::01.02. Ionosphere::01.02.04. Plasma Physics 
01. Atmosphere::01.02. Ionosphere::01.02.05. Wave propagation 
01. Atmosphere::01.02. Ionosphere::01.02.06. Instruments and techniques 
05. General::05.07. Space and Planetary sciences::05.07.01. Solar-terrestrial interaction 
05. General::05.07. Space and Planetary sciences::05.07.02. Space weather 
AbstractSpectral analyses are employed to investigate how the diurnal periodicity of the critical frequency of the sporadic E (Es) layer varies with solar activity. The study is based on ionograms recorded at the ionospheric station of Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E), Italy, from 1976 to 2009, a period of time covering three solar cycles. It was confirmed that the diurnal periodicity is always affected by an amplitude modulation with periods of several days, which is the proof that Es layers are affected indirectly by planetary waves through their non linear interaction with atmospheric tides at lower altitudes. The most striking features coming out from this study is however that this amplitude modulation is greater for high-solar activity than for low-solar activity.
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